West Perry School District

Home of the Mustangs

Three Year Olds

Below you will find a list of developmental milestones for three year olds. Keep in mind that not all children develop at the same time and will progress through these stages at their own pace. However, if you have concerns about your child’s development, it is important to talk with your child’s doctor. 

Developmental Milestones

Imitates adults doing simple tasks                                    Speaks in 3-4 word sentences

Matches shapes and colors                                             90%-100% of speech is 
                                                                                                                                 understood
                                                                                                                                                                                     
Shows circle, square, triangle when asked                          Doesn’t like to be bothered
during activities     

Can identify self as boy or girl                                        Snips with scissors

Can talk with others/answer simple questions                       Clings to favorite toy or blanket

5-10 minute attention span                                              Beginning to learn from
                                                                                                 listening

 

Taken from:  http://www.nppsd.org/pages/uploaded_files/Developmental%20Milestones%20brochure.pdf

 

Learning Activities

 

Three Year Olds

·        Offer arts and crafts activities that promote experimentation: crayons, washable markers, chalk, modeling clay, paper, glue, paints, large brushes

·        Provide a variety of books about different topics: animals, families, everyday events, alphabet and counting activities, poems and rhymes; continue to read daily

·        Take child tolibrary; allow child to choose books

·        Take child for walks at child’s pace; Encourage child to explore nature and talk about whathe/she sees, hears, smells

·        Provide blocks and allow child to sort by size, shape, color

·        Gather hats, articles of adult clothing, shoes that child can use for pretend play

·        Provide a tricycle, wheelbarrow, doll stroller, shopping cart for child to play with

Taken from: Allen, K. E. and L. R. Marotz. (2000). By the Ages:  Behavior and development of childrenpre-birth through eight. Albany: Delmar Thomson Learning.

 

 

 

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